Job-Hunting Teens: How to Design a Great CV

Making some spare cash when you’re a teen will always come in handy. Whether you want to save up for your first car, for college, or just want to earn some extra pocket money, the best way to go about it is to get yourself a part-time job. 

It’s easier said than done, though. When you have no work experience, what do you put on your CV? How do you make yourself stand out compared to those who do have experience? This can make it difficult to design a CV to submit, let alone interview for the job itself. 

If you are a teen struggling to write a CV or a parent of one that wants to give some guidance, then look no further. 

  • Focus on Your Skills

Everyone has skills, even if they don’t have specific work experience to back it up. Include a ‘skills’ section or list on your CV and dedicate this to your biggest strengths. This could be something like this if you were applying to a job in a store or a café:

  • Organized
  • Strong attention to detail
  • Social and a people person
  • Team player

All these items are essential skills needed to work in a hospitality or retail environment, and you can have them without having worked in that environment before. 

  • Use PurpleCV

Experience doesn’t necessarily have to be work experience. Experience you have gained during extracurricular activities such as on a sports team or after school club are just as valid to add to your CV as a job would be.  If you need help translating your experience, you can pay for a CV with PurpleCV, the CV experts who can turn your experiences into a great CV.  Their CV writers will ensure that you CV is specifically tailored to reflect your skills and experience, while also being able to stand out from the crowd in your job applications. Having a professional writer spruce up your CV is always a great investment, especially when you’re getting back into work.

If you have volunteered, this is an excellent experience to add to your CV too. Volunteer and extracurricular experience show recruiters that you have dedicated your time to a responsibility, even without the incentive of receiving payment, which often can be more valuable than work experience in some eyes. 

  • Be Enthusiastic

Show the recruiter how much you want the job you are applying for. Enthusiasm can go a long way in a CV; if you are dedicated and motivated to work, this can sometimes be more valuable than relevant work experience. 

To show this off, include a small personal statement at the top of your CV or attach a cover letter with your application. For each employer, reiterate how much you would like to work for their company and why. Tell them why you would be a good fit for the position. 

  • Refer to the Job Specifications

Job descriptions and specifications tell you exactly what the recruiter is looking for in an applicant, so you should take advantage of this. They will often use keywords or phrases such as strong team player or committed to providing great service; note down what phrases they use and make sure you show that you have these skills in your CV. 

  • Emphasize Your Education

Education is a valuable resource, and it provides you with the essential skills needed for most part-time jobs. If you have finished your homework on time, you have the skill of meeting strict deadlines. If you have worked on a group project and received a good grade, you have great team working skills. 

Job-hunting as a teen can be difficult, but with perseverance, you will get there! 

Written by
Jeremy Kaplan

A 50-something year old lifestyle, career, and education blogger based in Atlanta, Georgia. Years of experience in the office setting working with others and still loving it year-after-year.

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